Jim Greiner

Honorable S. William Green Professor of Public Law

Daniel James (Jim) Greiner is the Honorable S. William Green Professor of Public Law at Harvard Law School (US) and faculty director of the Access to Justice Lab. He is co-leading the Decriminalizing the Poor – The Effects of Abolishing Cash Bail project.

Greiner received a BA with high honors from the University of Virginia (US) in 1991 and a JD from the University of Michigan Law School in 1995. In 2002, he entered Harvard University’s graduate program in statistics, emerging in 2007 with a PhD. He joined the Harvard Law School faculty that same year and was awarded tenure in 2012. He clerked for the Honorable Patrick E. Higginbotham, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. He practiced law for six years, three for the Department of Justice (Federal Programs Branch), and three for Jenner & Block, attempting to focus on employment discrimination, voting rights and the Decennial Census, but alas, he also had to learn how airplanes get on and off aircraft carriers (in the A-12 litigation, which lasted for more than two decades), as well as how to deal with structural injunctions in long-running housing desegregation cases.

Currently Greiner’s research focuses on randomized field experiments in the legal setting, particularly in access to justice and adjudicatory administration. He has published papers on numerous such experiments and has numerous others either in the field or in planning. His prior research addressed ecological inference models often used in cases under Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act as well as the application of counterfactual frameworks of causal inference to civil rights issues. His work has been published in a variety of venues including the Harvard Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (Series B), the Annals of Applied Statistics, and Jurimetrics.