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Manos Tsakiris

Manos Tsakiris

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Manos Tsakiris is the inaugural 2016 NOMIS Awardee. He is professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London (London, England). He led the Body and Image in Arts and Sciences (BIAS) project and is currently director of the Centre for the Politics of Feelings.

Tsakiris was born in Greece. He received a BSc in psychology at Panteion University (Athens), an MSc in philosophy and at King’s College (London, UK) and an MSc in cognitive neuropsychology at University College London (UCL; London) before completing his PhD in psychology and cognitive neurosciences at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, in 2006. In 2007 he joined the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London. He is the recipient of the 2014 Young Mind and Brain Prize and the 22nd Experimental Psychology Society Prize.

Tsakiris’ research is highly interdisciplinary and uses a wide range of methods to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms that shape the experience of embodiment and self-identity. As part of the BIAS project, he addressed timely research questions at the intersection of the sciences and humanities with a particular focus on the biological mechanisms and cultural factors that shape our relationships to other people in a culture powered by images.

Manos Tsakiris | Awards Film

Manos Tsakiris | Insights Film

Manos Tsakiris's News

A study by NOMIS Awardee Manos Tsakiris and colleagues has shown that rhesus macaques can perceive their own heartbeat. The work could provide an important model for future psychiatric research, […]

NOMIS Awardee Manos Tsakiris has published an essay in Aeon addressing visceral politics. In an age thick with anger and fear, we might dream of a purely rational politics but […]

NOMIS researcher and Distinguished Scientist Award winner Professor Manos Tsakiris talks about how our bodies are represented in our brains and how neurocognitive mechanisms shape our physical experiences in his […]

Manos Tsakiris's Insights

Abstract: When we see new people, we rapidly form first impressions. Whereas past research has focused on the role of morphological or emotional cues, we asked whether transient visceral states bias the impressions we form. Across three studies (N = 94 university students), we investigated how fluctuations of bodily states, driven
Abstract: During political campaigns, candidates use rhetoric to advance competing visions and assessments of their country. Research reveals that the moral language used in this rhetoric can significantly influence citizens' political attitudes and behaviors; however, the moral language actually used in the rhetoric of elites during political campaigns remains understudied. Using