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Publications in Mitochondria by NOMIS researchers

NOMIS Researcher(s)

Published in

November 8, 2021

In order to combat molecular damage, most cellular proteins undergo rapid turnover. We have previously identified large nuclear protein assemblies that can persist for years in post-mitotic tissues and are subject to age-related decline. Here, we report that mitochondria can be long lived in the mouse brain and reveal that specific mitochondrial proteins have half-lives longer than the average proteome. These mitochondrial long-lived proteins (mitoLLPs) are core components of the electron transport chain (ETC) and display increased longevity in respiratory supercomplexes. We find that COX7C, a mitoLLP that forms a stable contact site between complexes I and IV, is required for complex IV and supercomplex assembly. Remarkably, even upon depletion of COX7C transcripts, ETC function is maintained for days, effectively uncoupling mitochondrial function from ongoing transcription of its mitoLLPs. Our results suggest that modulating protein longevity within the ETC is critical for mitochondrial proteome maintenance and the robustness of mitochondrial function.

Research field(s)
Health Sciences, Biomedical Research, Developmental Biology

NOMIS Researcher(s)

Published in

January 1, 2017

Age is, by far, the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) , yet few A Ddrug candidateshave been generated that target pathways specifically associated with the aging process itself. Two ubiquitous features of the aging brain are the intracellular accumulation of aggregated proteins and inflammation. As intraneuronal amyloid protein is detected before markers of inflammation, we argue that old, age-associated, aggregated proteins in neurons can induce inflammation, resulting inmultiple forms of brain toxicities. The consequence is the increased risk of old, age-associated, neurodegenerative diseases. As most of these diseases are associated with the accumulation of aggregated proteins, it is possible that any therapeutic that reduces intracellular protein aggregation will benefit all. – Currais, A., Fischer, W., Maher, P., Schubert, D. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

Research field(s)
Health Sciences, Biomedical Research, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology