Research
is our passion
Home / Projects / Using Triangulation to Characterize the Neurocomputational Basis of Simple Choice

Using Triangulation to Characterize the Neurocomputational Basis of Simple Choice

NOMIS Project 2019

— 2024

Antonio Rangel and his team are trying to understand how the brain assigns value to various options when faced with a choice, identifying the regions of the brain that encode those decisions. They are also investigating how the workings of the decision-making system change in more complex forms of choice, such as decisions involving self-control or altruism.

The project, Using Triangulation to Characterize the Neurocomputational Basis of Simple Choice, aims to advance our understanding of the neurocomputational basis of very simple decisions, such as choosing between an apple and an orange, by comparing how rodents, monkeys and humans make these types of choices. The research is predicated on the idea that studying the same decision problem in different species will provide critical insights into how humans make simple and more complex decisions.

 

Loading...

NOMIS Researcher(s)

Bing Professor of Neuroscience, Behavioral Biology, and Economics, and Head Faculty in Residence
California Institute of Technology
Loading...

Project News

NOMIS Awardee Antonio Rangel and colleagues have shown that peripheral visual information is crucial in facilitating good decisions and suggest that individuals might be influenceable by settings in which only […]

Loading...

Project Insights